Your introduction to cloud computing: The basics

Interested in finding out how cloud computing could benefit your business? If so, here's your primer on the cloud computing basics...

Cloud computing.

It’s one of those terms that everyone seems to know about.

There’s still plenty of people that don’t understand what it means to be “on the cloud.”

If you’re bringing cloud-services to an end-user, there’s a good chance they’ll have questions about how this technology works, and what it means to their business. An introduction to cloud computing can help you to explain why being on the cloud is such a positive thing, and what benefits are contributing to the future of the cloud ecosystem.

Here’s your primer on cloud computing basics.

What is cloud computing?

Ultimately, cloud computing is the process of bringing computing services like storage, networking, software, analytics, and intelligence to people through the internet. Instead of having a piece of hardware on-site that they use to access crucial tools, companies can use the cloud to communicate, store files, and even use software with nothing but an internet connection.

Cloud computing comes with benefits like:

  • Reduced costs: You don’t need to buy, maintain, and manage hardware and on-site data centres to make the most of the cloud. A software-based environment is cheaper to run.
  • Speed: An introduction to cloud computing can help businesses run their software faster. Most services are managed on the back-end, which keeps them running reliably and efficiently.
  • Global scale: Companies can start by implementing cloud computing basics, then scale their services up or down at the click of a button. There’s nothing to stop you from adding more computing power, bandwidth, and storage to your website immediately.
  • Productivity and performance: Cloud computing services run on a network of secure data centres that are regularly updated to give you better performance and productivity.
  • Reliability: Cloud computing makes it easier to keep your business running smoothly because you can automatically save your content to the cloud and hold that data at multiple sites across a cloud provider’s network.

Cloud providers can even offer exceptional security via state-of-the-art policies and controls intended to improve the resiliency of your operations.

The different types of cloud computing

One thing to be aware of when you’re explaining cloud basics to an end-user is that there are different types of cloud computing. Not all cloud options will be right for everyone. Services have evolved over the years to suit a range of solutions and requirements.

For instance, today, businesses can access:

  • Public cloud: Clouds owned and operated by third-party service providers that deliver solutions over the internet. A public cloud means that all the hardware, software, and infrastructure you access is owned and managed by a cloud provider.
  • Private cloud: In a private cloud, the resources available are only used by a single organisation or business. Private clouds can be located In an on-site data centre, or managed at a third-party data centre, depending on personal preferences.
  • Hybrid clouds: The hybrid cloud combines public and private technology. Applications and data are allocated between private and public environments to allow for greater flexibility and more deployment options.

There is also a range of cloud services available from providers today, such as infrastructure as a service, where IT infrastructure and virtual machines are available from a cloud provider, or platform as a service. Platform as a service gives companies an on-demand environment where they can develop and test software applications.

Why do companies need cloud computing?

Most of today’s businesses will end up using the cloud as part of their IT services in one format or another. Technology brands might rely on the cloud to test and build new applications. Consumer-based brands might use the cloud to collect data and analyse it so that they can make informed decisions about the future of their business. You can even access the cloud to store, back-up, and recover crucial data.

As the cloud continues to offer freedom and flexibility to businesses of all shapes and sizes, it’s finding its way into everything that we do. You may even already use the cloud for video conferencing or accessing software on demand.

If you want to learn more about the power of the cloud and how it’s affecting businesses today, reach out to Nice Network now to find out more.

Cloud computing.

It’s one of those terms that everyone seems to know about. However, there are still plenty of people who don’t understand what it means to be “on the cloud.”

If you’re bringing cloud-services to an end-user, there’s a good chance they’ll have questions about how this technology works, and what it means to their business. An introduction to cloud computing can help you explain why being on the cloud is such a positive thing, and what benefits are contributing to the future of the cloud ecosystem.

Here’s your primer on cloud computing basics.

What is cloud computing?

Ultimately, cloud computing is the process of bringing computing services like storage, networking, software, analytics, and intelligence to people through the internet. Instead of having a piece of hardware on-site that they use to access crucial tools, companies can use the cloud to communicate, store files, and even use software with nothing but an internet connection.

Cloud computing comes with benefits such as:

  • Reduced costs: You don’t need to buy, maintain, and manage hardware and on-site data centres to make the most of the cloud. A software-based environment is cheaper to run.
  • Speed: An introduction to cloud computing can help businesses run their software faster. Most services are managed on the back-end, which keeps them running reliably and efficiently.
  • Global scale: Companies can start by implementing cloud computing basics, then scale their services up or down at the click of a button. There’s nothing to stop you from adding more computing power, bandwidth, and storage to your website immediately.
  • Productivity and performance: Cloud computing services run on a network of secure data centres that are regularly updated to give you better performance and productivity.
  • Reliability: Cloud computing makes it easier to keep your business running smoothly because you can automatically save your content to the cloud and hold that data at multiple sites across a cloud provider’s network.

Cloud providers can even offer exceptional security via state-of-the-art policies and controls intended to improve the resiliency of your operations.

The different types of cloud computing

One thing to be aware of when you’re explaining cloud basics to an end-user is that there are different types of cloud computing. Not all cloud options will be right for everyone. Services have evolved over the years to suit a range of solutions and requirements.

For instance, today, businesses can access:

  • Public cloud: Clouds owned and operated by third-party service providers that deliver solutions over the internet. A public cloud means that all the hardware, software, and infrastructure you access is owned and managed by a cloud provider.
  • Private cloud: In a private cloud, the resources available are only used by a single organisation or business. Private clouds can be located In an on-site data centre, or managed at a third-party data centre, depending on personal preferences.
  • Hybrid clouds: The hybrid cloud combines public and private technology. Applications and data are allocated between private and public environments to allow for greater flexibility and more deployment options.

There is also a range of cloud services available from providers today, such as infrastructure as a service, where IT infrastructure and virtual machines are available from a cloud provider, or platform as a service. Platform as a service gives companies an on-demand environment where they can develop and test software applications.

Why do companies need cloud computing?

Most of today’s businesses will end up using the cloud as part of their IT services in one format or another. Technology brands might rely on the cloud to test and build new applications. Consumer-based brands might use the cloud to collect data and analyse it so that they can make informed decisions about the future of their business. You can even access the cloud to store, back-up, and recover crucial data.

As the cloud continues to offer freedom and flexibility to businesses of all shapes and sizes, it’s finding its way into everything that we do. You may even already use the cloud for video conferencing or accessing software on demand.

If you want to learn more about the power of the cloud and how it’s affecting businesses today, reach out to Nice Network now to find out more.